Concert review

London, Jazz Cafe, 25 Jan 2001

26 Jan 2001
Dotmusic.com
Simon P. Ward

John Martyn
Jazz Cafe, London

Say what you like about John Martyn but there's no doubt that after 35 years in the business he's still taking risks. Tonight he's accompanied by a sax player 1 who offered his services after recording with Martyn in the studio the day before. No warm-up, nothing. And it sounds fantastic.

Edinburgh, Liquid Room, 28 Jun 2000

6 Jul 2000
The List #390
Norman Chalmers

It's more than 30 years since lain McGeachy hit the road south from Glasgow to record his first album -the acoustic guitar-driven period piece London Conversation- changed his name to John Martyn, and began a career in music that, if it hasn't made him rich in worldly terms, has earned the wayward Scotsman critical acclaim and a world-wide following.

Related to: 
Glasgow Walker

Glasgow, The Garage, 23 Jul 1999

26 Jul 1999
Glasgow Herald
Rob Adams

John Martyn,
The Garage, Glasgow

What a long strange voyage these past 30 years have been for John Martyn-watchers. From boss acoustic fingerpicking through free- wheeling jazz, reggae and hip-hop experiments, the good ship McGeachie (his real name) has sailed, with occasional becalmed moments but with the interest always sustained by the mystery of where journey's end might be.

New York, Bottom Line, 8 Sep 1993

8 Sep 1993
New York Times
Jon Pareles

Pop and Jazz in Review
By JON PARELES

John Martyn The Bottom Line

The blues is a touchstone for John Martyn. In the blues, he found music that transmutes pain into beauty, music that initiates select listeners into a secret world of loneliness and danger. But he didn't become one more blues imitator. Instead, he forged a highly individual style from British folk songs, jazz, soul and his own eccentricities: music with pinpoint syncopated vamps under hazy, free-form vocals, in songs that contemplate death and mourn lost love.

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